Home » Ship & Submarine Models » Submarine » USS Olympia (SSN-717) FLT I Submarine Model

USS Olympia (SSN-717) FLT I Submarine Model

$354.00

2 in stock (can be backordered)

SKU: 840231544689 Categories: , Tags: ,

Description

USS Olympia (SSN-717) FLT I Submarine Model

Sail again with the crew of the USS Olympia (SSN-717) FLT I in this handcrafted wooden submarine model. Each piece is carved from wood and handpainted to provide a piece you’ll love.

Length – 20 inches

USS Olympia (SSN-717) is a Los Angeles-class submarine of the United States Navy. She is the 30th Los Angeles class nuclear powered fast attack submarine.

Etymology
Olympia is the second ship of the U.S. Navy to be named for Olympia, Washington.

History
The contract to build her was awarded to Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company in Newport News, Virginia on 15 September 1977 and her keel was laid down on 31 March 1981. She was launched on 30 April 1983 sponsored by Mrs. Dorothy Williams, and commissioned on 17 November 1984.[3]

Olympia was assigned to Submarine Squadron 7 (SUBRON SEVEN) and was homeported in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

In 1998, Olympia became the first Pacific-based submarine to pass through the Suez Canal in over 35 years.

When USS Bremerton (SSN-698) became inactive in August 2018, Olympia became the oldest commissioned attack submarine in active service in the Pacific Fleet. Keeping with a tradition that dates back to World War II, Richard O’Kane’s cribbage board was transferred from Bremerton to Olympia’s wardroom.[5] When Olympia transferred to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard for decommissioning on 29 October 2019, the board was then transferred to the wardroom of USS Chicago (SSN-721), which was then the oldest active fast attack submarine in the Pacific Fleet.[6] USS Providence (SSN-719) is the oldest fast attack submarine in active service, but currently assigned to the Atlantic Fleet.

Olympia arrived in Bremerton, WA, on Thursday, October 31, 2019, for decommissioning after completing a final circumnavigation. Like all other recent U.S. submarines, the vessel will be recycled via the Navy’s Ship-Submarine Recycling Program.