Home » Aircraft Models » 75th Fighter Interceptor Squadron F-89 model

75th Fighter Interceptor Squadron F-89 model

$279.00

Description

75th Fighter Interceptor Squadron F-89 model

Fly with the 75th Fighter Interceptor Squadron in this handcrafted F-89 model. Each piece is carved from wood and handpainted to provide a piece you’ll love.

The 75th Fighter Squadron’s first assignment as an active unit was in the China-Burma-India theatre. Some members of the famous American Volunteer Group known as the “Flying Tigers” joined the 75th Fighter Squadron after the AVG was disbanded.[3][4] This group of men, under the leadership of General Claire Lee Chennault, engaged in aerial combat against the Japanese very soon after 7 December 1941.[5]

On the same day as its activation, the 75th scored its first major victory during a night interception flight against Japanese bombers. This was the first night interception ever attempted over the China theatre and gave the Japanese quite a shock. The intercepting pilots were credited with the destruction of two enemy bombers and two probables.

During the early days of its history, the 75th’s mission was to attack and destroy the enemy by strafing airfields, troops, and supply depots, while maintaining air superiority so that the Japanese could not locate and bomb targets in China. Operating from numerous airfields within China, the 75th Fighter Squadron compiled an impressive record during World War II and received the Presidential Unit Citation. After World War II, the squadron returned to the United States and was stationed at Fort Lewis, Washington. There the squadron was inactivated on 5 January 1946.

Air Defense Command

75th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron North American F-86A Sabre 49-1280 with a Navy Grumman F9F-6 Cougar over Long Island, 1952
Following a period of activations and inactivations, during which the squadron was assigned to such bases as Northwest Field, Guam, and Howard Air Force Base, Canal Zone, the squadron returned to active duty on 12 January 1951 as the 75th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron stationed at Presque Isle Air Force Base, Maine. During this period, the 75th served under the Air Defense Command and flew the F-86 Sabre day interceptors with a mission to maintain a high degree of operational proficiency so that it might repel any possible enemy air attack. It upgraded to the F-86D Sabre Interceptor in 1953 at Suffolk County Air Force Base, New York, where the squadron remained for three years before moving to Dow Air Force Base, Maine.

Upon return to Maine in 1959 the squadron converted to the McDonnell F-101B Voodoo supersonic interceptor and the F-101F operational and conversion trainer. The two-seat trainer version was equipped with dual controls, but carried the same armament as the F-101B and were fully combat-capable. On 22 October 1962, before President John F. Kennedy told Americans that missiles were in place in Cuba, the squadron dispersed one third of its force, equipped with nuclear tipped missiles to Niagara Falls International Airport at the start of the Cuban Missile Crisis.[6][7] These planes returned to Dow after the crisis.

The squadron remained at Dow Air Force Base until 1968 when it was transferred to Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Michigan. The squadron inactivated there on 30 November 1969 as part of the drawdown of ADC interceptor bases, the aircraft being passed along to the Air National Guard